Showing posts with label Roscoe Arbuckle. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Roscoe Arbuckle. Show all posts

Friday, March 13, 2015

Roscoe Arbuckle visits the Lone Star Studio, 1916

Judging from the costumes, Chaplin was filming Behind The Screen. Henry Bergman is between Chaplin and Arbuckle. Eric Campbell is at left. Everyone appears to be checking out Arbuckle's fancy car.

Photo from Chaplin's Schatten by Fritz Hirzel (1982), credited to MOMA, NYC.
 Courtesy of Dominique Dugros.

Saturday, January 10, 2015

Photos of Chaplin with his 162-lb marlin swordfish at Catalina Island, October 6th, 1918

Chaplin landed the fish in 22 minutes.
On the right is Capt. J. Edmundson, one of the Catalina Island boatmen.
Photo: www.idamay.org
Chaplin's future wife Mildred Harris (they were married 17 days later)
poses with Charlie and his catch (and the capt.)
Photo: My Life In Pictures by Chaplin

Below are a couple of other photos that appear to have been taken the same day.

Chaplin, left, is pointing to the fish and to himself. Roscoe "Fatty"Arbuckle is on the right.
I'm not sure who the man in the middle is (Cecil Reynolds?)
Photo: Roy Export SAS
With  Arbuckle.
Photo: Chaplin: Genius Of The Cinema by Jeffrey Vance

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

THE MASQUERADER, released August 27th, 1914

This film is noted for Charlie's female impersonation (which is flawless), but to me, one of the best things about it is the business at the beginning with Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle. They will do a full-fledged pairing up two films later in The Rounders (Chaplin & Arbuckle appeared together in seven Keystones).


screenshots from Chaplin At Keystone (Flicker Alley)

Sunday, March 9, 2014

TANGO TANGLES, released March 9th, 1914

Directed by Mack Sennett.

Filmed at the Venice Dance Hall, this film is unique because its three main characters (Chaplin, Roscoe Arbuckle, and Ford Sterling) appear without their usual costumes and make-up. Basic plot: three men vie for the attentions of the hat check girl at the dance hall.

Numerous sources credit the role of the hat check girl to Sadie Lampe
 but her identity has never been fully confirmed.
If there are no bricks or custard pies around, just throw a human being.
One of my favorite intertitles.

Sunday, October 13, 2013

Keystone banquet at Levy's Cafe, 1915

Charlie was already at Essanay by this time, but you'll recognize many of his co-stars. It's always interesting to see these folks out of costume.

From Father Goose: The Story Of Mack Sennett by Gene Fowler (1934)

Saturday, September 7, 2013

The Rounders, released September 7th, 1914


According to Minta Durfee, Roscoe Arbuckle's first wife (& also his wife in the film), the boat filling with water was Arbuckle's idea and was intended to be a practical joke on Charlie because of his aversion to it. In Kevin Brownlow's The Parade's Gone By, Minta is quoted as saying: "Charlie hated water...And later on, he and my husband did one of the most difficult things an actor can do: in the last scene they lay in a boat, pretending to be dead drunk, while it slowly sank in the middle of Echo Park Lake. For a man who hates water, that was pretty good.”
Charlie must have been a good sport because he appears to be unable to keep a straight face as they disappear beneath the surface.


However I find the notion that Charlie was afraid of water interesting because he enjoyed swimming most of his life and gets wet in several other films including A Film Johnnie, The Masquerader (which was released only a couple of weeks before this film), Shanghaied, A Night In The Show, The Cure, The Adventurer, City Lights, Modern Times, etc. Perhaps he didn't like to be surprised by water, which is understandable.

This post was previously published on January 3rd, 2013.

Monday, January 7, 2013

Coney Island, c. 1915

L-R: "Broncho Billy" Anderson, CC, & Roscoe Arbuckle.
Anderson along with George K. Spoor founded the Essanay Studios ("S" & "A"). Charlie signed with the company in late 1914.

Thursday, January 3, 2013

Roscoe Arbuckle & Charlie in the final scene of The Rounders (1914)


According to Minta Durfee, Arbuckle's first wife (& also his wife in the film), the boat filling with water was Arbuckle's idea and was intended to be a practical joke on Charlie because of his aversion to it. In Kevin Brownlow's The Parade's Gone By, Minta is quoted as saying: "Charlie hated water...And later on, he and my husband did one of the most difficult things an actor can do: in the last scene they lay in a boat, pretending to be dead drunk, while it slowly sank in the middle of Echo Park Lake. For a man who hates water, that was pretty good.”
Charlie must have been a good sport because he appears to be unable to keep a straight face as they disappear beneath the surface.


However I find the notion that Charlie was afraid of water interesting because he enjoyed swimming most of his life and gets wet in several other films including A Film JohnnieThe Masquerader (which was released only a couple of weeks before this film), Shanghaied, A Night In The Show, The Cure, The Adventurer, City Lights, Modern Times, etc. Perhaps he didn't like to be surprised by water, which is understandable.