Showing posts with label Minta Durfee. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Minta Durfee. Show all posts

Saturday, March 26, 2016

CRUEL, CRUEL LOVE, released March 26th, 1914

Directed by George Nichols
Screenplay by Craig Hutchinson

Charlie's fiancee (Minta Durfee) jumps to the wrong conclusion when she sees him assisting her maid (Eva Nelson) who has twisted her ankle. She breaks off their engagement and tells him she never wants to see him again. Distraught, Charlie attempts suicide by taking poison. He writhes in agony and has a "vision of his destiny": being tortured in hell by pitchfork-wielding demons. In the meantime, his fiancee learns the truth and sends him a note telling him all is forgiven. A frantic Charlie phones the doctor and discovers that the supposed poison was only water.

Instead of his Tramp costume, Chaplin is wearing a modified version of the costume he wore in Making A Living.


Sunday, October 13, 2013

Keystone banquet at Levy's Cafe, 1915

Charlie was already at Essanay by this time, but you'll recognize many of his co-stars. It's always interesting to see these folks out of costume.

From Father Goose: The Story Of Mack Sennett by Gene Fowler (1934)

Saturday, September 7, 2013

The Rounders, released September 7th, 1914


According to Minta Durfee, Roscoe Arbuckle's first wife (& also his wife in the film), the boat filling with water was Arbuckle's idea and was intended to be a practical joke on Charlie because of his aversion to it. In Kevin Brownlow's The Parade's Gone By, Minta is quoted as saying: "Charlie hated water...And later on, he and my husband did one of the most difficult things an actor can do: in the last scene they lay in a boat, pretending to be dead drunk, while it slowly sank in the middle of Echo Park Lake. For a man who hates water, that was pretty good.”
Charlie must have been a good sport because he appears to be unable to keep a straight face as they disappear beneath the surface.


However I find the notion that Charlie was afraid of water interesting because he enjoyed swimming most of his life and gets wet in several other films including A Film Johnnie, The Masquerader (which was released only a couple of weeks before this film), Shanghaied, A Night In The Show, The Cure, The Adventurer, City Lights, Modern Times, etc. Perhaps he didn't like to be surprised by water, which is understandable.

This post was previously published on January 3rd, 2013.

Thursday, January 3, 2013

Roscoe Arbuckle & Charlie in the final scene of The Rounders (1914)


According to Minta Durfee, Arbuckle's first wife (& also his wife in the film), the boat filling with water was Arbuckle's idea and was intended to be a practical joke on Charlie because of his aversion to it. In Kevin Brownlow's The Parade's Gone By, Minta is quoted as saying: "Charlie hated water...And later on, he and my husband did one of the most difficult things an actor can do: in the last scene they lay in a boat, pretending to be dead drunk, while it slowly sank in the middle of Echo Park Lake. For a man who hates water, that was pretty good.”
Charlie must have been a good sport because he appears to be unable to keep a straight face as they disappear beneath the surface.


However I find the notion that Charlie was afraid of water interesting because he enjoyed swimming most of his life and gets wet in several other films including A Film JohnnieThe Masquerader (which was released only a couple of weeks before this film), Shanghaied, A Night In The Show, The Cure, The Adventurer, City Lights, Modern Times, etc. Perhaps he didn't like to be surprised by water, which is understandable.